Okay… I solved it, but how’s that math?

Its on these warm, spring days that some learners tend to start checking out. They recognize our typical reviewing and recirculating attempts to help students recapture some learning before the last tests and exams. But some of them learned the content the first time. Essentially, this time of year can bring with it a lot of down time for our students who learn the fastest.

That’s when I like to pull out my old college textbooks. I spoke before of the power of ungraded bonus problems. If interesting and placed properly, they can provide powerful opportunities for thinking simply for the sake of thinking. I like to give them a window into math that “doesn’t look like math.” After all, most of the content that K-12 mathematics includes has some commonalities that students get used to. They’ve gotten used to “what math looks like.”

Today, four groups got a problem that I adapted from one of my undergrad courses that I took at WMU with Dr. Ping Zhang who, along with Dr. Gary Chartrand co-authored this book which was the textbook for the course I took.

The problem is adapted from Example 1.1 from Chapter 1. It asks the students to create a schedule for 7 committees that share ten people. Now, the purpose of the problem in the book is to give a simple example of how a graph can be used to visualize a complex situation. Often the way a problem is mathematically modeled can change the intensity of the solution process.

 

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Figure 1.1 from Page 1

 

The reason I like to give this problem (and problems detached from the K-12 curriculum in general) is that in May, to curious students, these problems tend to hit the perplexity button just in the right spot. In fact, all the students looked at the handout at first and were unimpressed. Until I asked them to read it… then, they seemed to just want to see what the answer looked like. As one student put it, “It seems really easy at first, then you get into it and it’s actually harder than we thought.”

Graph theory is about creating visual representations. I didn’t want to ruin their experience by pigeon-holing them into trying to represent this they way I knew they could. And given the time, that didn’t stop this group from creating a similar idea. Not with a graph, but they did use crayons.

 

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To hear Kailey explain: “We just gave each person their own color. Then we knew we could have two committees meet at the same time if they didn’t have any colors in common.” That isn’t different thinking, really. Just a different representation.

I enjoy the conversations that come out it. No grade. Just doing math for the sake of thinking about something that’s interesting. It’s especially interesting to students like Katie who said, “Okay… I solved it, but how’s that math?”

 

Reference

Introduction to Graph Theory (2005) Chartrand, G., and Zhang, P., New York: McGraw Hill

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Trig Curiosity

There is something about a question not being graded that makes the students aggressive and risky. That can create the conditions for some of the best thinking. There are many days when I think grades and points and the division between problems that I will “collect and grade” versus the ones that I will not.

In the system in which I exist, sometimes bonus questions on formative assessments are the only way to really perplex a student – to push them at the risk of pushing each student beyond their current ability to reason, but still get a solid effort.

On today’s quiz, I added the following question as a bonus:

If you type “Tan 90″ into a calculator, you will get an error message. Knowing what you know about trig, discuss the possible reasons that taking the tangent of a right angle in a triangle would make your calculator show an error message.”

This isn’t something that has come up in any of our discussions. I would like to share with you some of my student’s answers.

From James: “It has an opposite which is the hypotenuse, but it has two adjacents so you wouldn’t know which one to use unless you put it in the calculator.”

From Tyler: “There is no such thing because when you plug in Cos 90 you get 0 and when you plug in Sin 90 you get 1. Maybe it is because since Tangent is TOA, it tries to add up to 90, so like opposite is 30 degrees and adjacent is 60 degrees.”

From Brianna: “Because Tan 90 would be opposite/adjacent, but the opposite side of the 90-degree angle is the hypotenuse and you can’t have the hypotenuse on top.”

From Jeremy: “It shows an error message because the right angle on a triangle doesn’t have a defined opposite or adjacent side length because the angle is touching both legs.”

From Lauren: “With tangent, you are finding opposite/adjacent. Those are the legs, and that 90-degree angle is being made by the legs.”

From Dayna: ” There could be an error because the opposite of the right angle is also the hypotenuse of the triangle.”

Quiz Bonus 3

From Ally: It’s not clear where the negative idea comes from, but it is curious that in a Trig world of decimals and fractions, 90 in the other functions gives 1 and 0.

Quiz Bonus 2

From Victor

 

Quiz Bonus 1

Perhaps Josh’s picture says it all.

 

Now, the next question: If the “two-adjacent-sides-so-the-calculator-doesn’t-know-which-you-mean…” explanation wins out…

…then why don’t we get an error message for Cos 90?

Mosaic Math

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I found some more math in Lansing, MI. Right downtown, actually. The Lansing Art Gallery has a rather artsy front entrance. It looks like this.

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See the green circle? See it? Looks like Pac Man. This one:

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Closer inspection reveals that it is a green mosaic circle partially covered by a red mosaic rectangle. This grabbed my attention while I was strolling waiting to pick up a Cottage Inn pizza. I wondered how many green mosaic pieces were “underneath” the rectangle. I also wondered what percentage of the circle was covered up by the red rectangle.

Let me know if you get a solution. I’ll let you know when I get one.

Coke vs. Sprite – One Class’ Response to Dan Meyer’s #wcydwt Video

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Almost three years ago, I highlighted the Coke vs. Sprite video that @ddmeyer made. It is a very intriguing question (which glass contains a greater amount of its original pop) without a clear answer.

Today, I let a class give it a go and here’s what they came up with.

First, they chose to model it with integers. Said one student: “I pretended it was a jar with 10,000 marbles.” 2014-04-03 11.07.36

Then they assigned “a dropper-full” to be 100 marbles. So, the first dropper took 100 red marbles and placed them into the jar with the 10,000 green marbles.

Now we assumed the stirring made the mixture homogeneous which meant that there was a consistent 100:1 green-to-red marble ratio in the right jar. So, when we pull another 100 marbles to put back, (with a little bit of rounding) we pull 99 green marbles and a single red marble back into the left jar.

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A little number crunching reveals (at least in this model) that there would be 9901 original-colored marbles and 99 other-colored marbles in each jar.

My original assumption matches their investigation. It seems (at least by this model) that at the end of the video, each glass is containing equal amounts of their original soda.

Another teacher Chris Hunter (@ChrisHunter36) also battled with this video and created an excellent read about his experiences. Check them out.

 

Our Geometry Support Site

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So, I’ve talked about Khan Academy before. They make instructional videos for students to watch and learn from.

 

I’ve talked about #flipclass before. In this model, the teacher makes videos for the students to watch and learn from.

 

I like the idea of students having instructional videos to watch and learn from. But, in both Khan Academy (and other related sites) as well as flipped classes, the students are recipients of the videos. We decided that we didn’t want them to simply be recipients. We decided that we wanted them to be producers of the resources, too. So, we decided to just let the students create the math help videos.

Here’s what they did: Today I unveil the @PennGeometry Beta for your review and feedback. Currently, there are videos created from one practice test about triangle similarity. We would like to expand and continually improve.

 

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All of the videos are designed, produced, and completed by our students. Some of my students were sensitive to the boring math video and tried to add their personality to the video. We would love some comments, “likes”, and constructive feedback. Please check it out. Eventually, we want to add our voices to the overall mathematics community to support those in need.

Check it out and let us know what you think. We look forward to hearing from you.

The Power of Network: The Wedding Cake Problem

I have another wonderful story about the power of the wider math community to support its own. Earlier in March I presented at MACUL 2014 in Grand Rapids, MI. During that presentation, I led the group through an experience with the Wedding Cake Problem, which ended up being a wonderfully energetic interaction.

Sitting in that meeting was a gentleman named Jeff who teaches at a school in Michigan. He wrote me an email some time later that included a message and the following photos:

“I’m planning on using the cake problem this week as review in my Trigonometry class, as well as later in the year with my Geometry students. Well, here are a few improvements, well, really just pictures. See attached.
Pans are 5″, 7″ and 9″. I think I’m just going to give my class the actual pans without the pictures.”

Cake-Pans

Cake-Pan-Side-View

Cake-Pans-Stacked

Cake-Pan-Top

Cake-Pan-Top-Ruler

 

 

Now, these photos change the dynamic a bit, don’t they? Let’s do pros and cons… What do you like better about giving the problem with these pictures? What do you prefer about the original problem?

I would love some feedback (especially if you have tried either one with your class).

Perplexing the students… by accident.

It seems like in undergrad, the line sounds kind of like this: “Just pick a nice open-ended question and have the students discuss it.” It sounds really good, too.

Except sometimes the students aren’t in the mood to talk. Or they would rather talk about a different part of the problem than you intended. Or their skill set isn’t strong enough in the right areas to engage the discussion. Or the loudest voice in the room shuts the conversation down. Or… something else happens. It’s a fact of teaching. Open-ended questions don’t always lead to discussions. And even if they did, class discussions aren’t always the yellow-brick road lead to the magical land of learning.

But sometimes they are. Today, it was. And today, it certainly wasn’t from the open-ended question that I was expecting. We are in the early stages of our unit on similarity. I had given a handout that included this picture

Similar Quads

… and I had asked them to pair up the corresponding parts.

The first thing that happened is that half-ish of the students determined that in figures that are connected by a scale factor (we hadn’t defined “similar” yet), each angle in one image has a congruent match in the other image. This is a nice observation. They didn’t flat out say that they had made that assumption, but they behaved as though they did and I suspect it is because angles are easier to measure on a larger image. So, being high school students and wanted to save a bit of time, they measured the angles in the bigger quadrilateral and then simply filled in the matching angles in the other.

Here’s were the fun begins. You see, each quadrilateral has two acute angles. Those angles have measures that are NOT that different (depending on the person wielding the protractor, maybe only 10 degrees difference). And it worked perfectly that about half of the class paired up one set of angles and the other half disagreed. And they both cared that they were right. It was the perfect storm!

Not wanting to remeasure, they ran through all sorts of different explanations to how they were right, which led us to eventually try labeling side lengths to try to sides to identify included angles for the sake of matching up corresponding sides. But, that line of thought wasn’t clear to everyone, which offered growth potential there as well.

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By the time we came to an agreement on where the angle measures go, the class pretty much agreed that:

1. Matching corresponding parts in similar polygons is not nearly as easy as it is in congruent polygons.

2. Similar polygons have congruent corresponding angles.

3. The longest side in the big shape will correspond to the longest side in the small shape. The second longest side in the big, will correspond to the second longest side in the small. The third… and so on.

4. Corresponding angles will be “located” in the same spot relative to the side lengths. For example, the angle included by the longest side and the second longest side in the big polygon will correspond to the angle included by the longest side and the second longest side in the small polygon. (This was a tricky idea for a few of them, but they were trying to get it.)

5. Not knowing which polygon is a “pre-image” (so to speak) means that we have to be prepared to discuss two different scale factors, which are reciprocals of each other. (To be fair, this is a point that has come up prior to this class discussion, but it settled in for a few of them today.)

I’d say that’s a pretty good set of statements for a class discussion I never saw coming.