Bankshot (I give 3-Act Lessons another try…)

Feel free to read this post, but the video I present at the bottom has since been revised. After you read this post and watch the video, I’d encourage you to read the comments. Then head over to Bankshot 3-Act Revised to check out how I interpreted the feedback.

I recently attended a workshop led by Dan Meyer (@ddmeyer) which I found to be incredibly valuable. In the workshop, Mr. Meyer broke down the 3-Act lesson design model that he describes on his blog. He demonstrated it and showed a few of his own examples as well as some of Andrew Stadel’s (@mr_stadel)I have been trying to make sense of the 3-Act model for a while now. I had continually felt confused by a handful of the aspects. I tried to do some activities but found that I was often either giving the students too much information or not nearly enough.

Bottom line, I was confused about the basic point of the 3-Act Model. It is designed in a way that maximizes engagement and allows you to raise the bar while being more inclusive (which is tricky business). The first act, you set the students up to be curious about the situation. You prepare a scenario where a handful of outcomes seem likely and ask the students to choose which of the outcomes they suspect will happen. This is a short amount of time. You get the students curious, you have them choose a camp and then move on.

In act 2, you start leading the students through the mathematical processes that will allow the students to rule out focus on the outcome(s) that seem to be the most supported by the math. This is where the students begin to explore the variables of the situations, determine the appropriate modeling mechanisms and choose which tools they are going to use. This might also be where you lecture them a bit if they are trying to use models that they are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with.

In act 3, you reveal the answer and the allow the students to make sense of any differences that “real life” has with mathematical modeling.

In an earlier post (the value of face-to-face) I commented on how powerful I find in-person, face-to-face interactions and how the #MTBoS, as powerful as it is, is unable to accommodate for this particular shortcoming. That is only more solidified in my mind now, after seeing how much better I understand the overall approach and value of the 3-Act model having gotten to interact with Mr. Meyer face-to-face, ask him questions, and hear his responses.

So… I decided to try again.

For my first Act I, I decided to go with a geometry/physics topic. Also, the Act II is still in production. So, it probably isn’t quite ready for implementation yet, but I want to see if I am actually making progress in being able to understand, deliver, and (hopefully) create 3-Act lessons.

Enjoy…