Why do we collect student work?

 

 

 

For a couple reasons, I’m sure. Here’s one of mine: to turn it around and let them see it.

Best Proof Snip

 

“Here are four proofs written by your classmates. Which of them is the best? Why? Which of them comes in second place? What would the second place proof need to change in order to tie for first?”

 

Such good conversations arise when students explore decent examples of their own work compared to their classmates. And they don’t have to be time-consuming. If the work suits it, you could create a 5-minute opener comparing just two pieces of work. It can be a wonderful way for a student to recognize his/her own mistakes without me, as teacher, having to reveal them. Such recognition is a wonderful evidence of internalization of the content… real learning that can be used to solve problems.

 

Why do you collect student work?

 

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Fun with The Magic Octagon

So, we are wrapping up our unit in Geometry on rigid transformations, which means it is that wonderful time of year when I show the students Dan Meyer’s The Magic Octagon!

Seriously… have you seen this? (Go through it like a student. Pause it to make your first prediction.)

The Magic Octagon from Dan Meyer on Vimeo.

Isn’t that cool? Not sure whether you predicted correctly or not (I did not the first time), but I’ve used this video with 6 or so geometry classes and the results are somewhat predictable. 85-90% of the class guesses 10:00. Most of the remaining voters choose 7ish:00 and get called crazy.

Then they see the answer and they JUST… CAN’T… BELIEVE IT!

“Wait… wait. How does one side go clockwise and the other side go counterclockwise?

“No. Run the video again. What did I miss?

That would be a 10-out-of-10 on the perplexity scale, when, like 85-90% of the class gets the math problem wrong and that suddenly becomes a motivator!

Then as they start trying to figure it out, they start making lots of hand gestures, which is surprisingly helpful to them and

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Then they don’t want you to move on. They want two more minutes to talk about it. Then a classmate starts explaining it. Not all of them get it the first time, but some of the demand to have it explained again.

Then they move on to the second rotation and they feel so confident. You ask for explanations. They give them… quickly. Quickly because they can’t wait to see the answer. And then they did.

And those who got it right cheered! Quite loudly.

Then a boy stopped us and offered a sequel.

“If the front side arrow is pointed at 5:00, would the other arrow point at 5:00, too?”

He turned the tables enough close to the end of the hour that we left with that question unanswered.

 

And I fully expect a couple students to have something to say about it tomorrow.

Kids, I’ll tell you why you need math…

So I was at Kroger and I was thirsty.

I went to the cooler to pick out a 20 oz. Coke. $1.69. Reasonable. About what you’ll pay most places, at least around these parts.

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But I had some more shopping to do. So, I kept walking. Gathering the items on my list.

Then I saw some 2-liter Cokes. (Remind me. Which is a bigger amount of Coke? 2 Liters? or 20 ounces?)

The 2-Liter Coke was priced at “2/$3.00”. (Which, I’m pretty sure is less than $1.69.)

(Oh! And you don’t have to buy 2 to get that price. Kroger is awesome like that.)
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I get pricing a little bit. I worked concessions at a college football stadium for a while (true story, by the way). I know the shtick. It’s upselling.

“For an extra quarter, you get almost double the pop!”

But this isn’t like that.

You have to buy 4 twenty-ouncers to fill a 2-liter. 4! You include the 10-cent bottle deposit here in the great state of Michigan, and that’s over $7.00!

2-Liter? $1.50

This isn’t even close.

Kids, THAT’S why you learn math.