My Most Recent Thoughts About Student Blogging

I have spent the last few months processing this temptation to integrate student blogging into my instructional practice. I have some medium-rare ideas. And some Iron Chef colleagues who do a nice job of focusing my thoughts and cooking medium-rare ideas. Like this very evening in a conversation with two such colleagues:

 

 

Like… bingo. That’s it.

 

So, here’s are my goals. Here’s what I’d like to accomplish:

A. I want to give the students a meaningful way to explore math topics, or think mathematically when they aren’t in my classroom. I don’t trust traditional homework problems to achieve this goal. I think there is value in understanding that in class we spend an hour exploring thoughts and ideas that have real value during that hour and the other 23 hours of the day. I’d like to create SOME mechanism that enforces that.

B. I want to give the students a chance to develop their own voice when talking, writing, and reasoning mathematically. Too often, I use gimmicky phrases, memorized lingo, and rigid vocabulary to guide student language. There are wonderful reasons for this. But, I want them to develop their own voice, too. I’d like to see them develop their own ability to verbalize a mathematical idea and…

C. I want to open the students’ ideas up to each other and to the greater math and educational community. I feel like this will offer a level of authenticity that simply having the students submit their work to me wouldn’t. Also, I want them to be able to think about the mathematical statements of another student and respond. I want to break away from this idea that the students produce work simply for my review. A mathematical statement isn’t good and valuable simply because I say so.

I think blogging can do that. I am sure other things can do that. Perhaps other things that are easier. Or less risky. Or have undergone better battle-testing. Or…

 

And as for the second question. The evidence would be a gradual improvement in the math discourse in class. More people talking, and talking better. Explorations becoming richer. Questions becoming an increasingly regular occurrence. Students trusting each other, and themselves, and not looking at me as the lone mathematical authority in the room. We would begin to talk and explore together, and sense-making would become a bigger and bigger part of what we do.

I told you. Medium-rare ideas.

I’m hoping that some more of my Iron Chef colleagues will take my ideas, season them, finish cooking them, and help me turn them into an action plan.

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My advice to the newly “en-Twitter-Blogged” (reflection on #edcampmm )

Today I got to meet a lot of folks at EdCamp Mid-Michigan in Charlotte, MI. Some of them are seasoned tweeters and bloggers (Elizabeth Wellfare – @ealfoster or Tara Becker-Utess @t_becker10, for example) and some are just starting out. A couple of people got set up with their very first Twitter handles today. Welcome. I talked to a couple folks who are interested in starting their own blogs (or rethinking the way they use the blog they already have).

Now, that EdCamp is over, we start the “now what?” stage of all the new stuff we learned.

What are we going to do with it?

How intensely do we want to attack it?

How is it going to be useful to us in the practice of constantly improving as educators?

All of these are fantastic questions. We discussed some of these issues already, but I want to offer a bit of encouragement and advice.

First, don’t be afraid to be selfish. (I believe Dan Meyer – @ddmeyer gave this same advice a few weeks back). By that, I mean that you are likely going to take a WHOLE LOT more than you give for a while as you start out in the world of twitter and blogging. That’s okay.

The first major idea is trying to decide what you want the Twitter feed or the blog to do for you and your professional practice. Sometimes the first step in that is seeing what other people are doing. How do they tweet? What do they tweet about? How do they use #hashtags? What do they blog about? What types of blogs/tweets are interesting for you to read?

Tweet and blog about the stuff you find interesting. Your blog and your tweets should AT LEAST be interesting to you.

Second, keep at it. When you first start tweeting/blogging, chances are that you (and a very few other people) are going to be the only ones reading. That’s okay. That changes over time. The more you write/tweet/interact/question/comment/favorite the more you will find people who are trying to do the same things you are doing. And THAT is what you want. You want to begin to form a network of people who are all trying to support each other in common goals.

Now, if you are brand new to this, follow me at @hs_math_phys. When you start your blog, tweet me the link to your blog. I look forward to reading your ideas and thoughts.

Finally, if you want a nice network of people who want to read your thoughts, check out The MathTwitterBlogoSphere homepage for a ton of GREAT bloggers and tweeters. Don’t let the name fool you, it’s not just for math teachers. There are takeaways for educators of all makes and models. They are good people.

Welcome to our world. Please don’t be a stranger. And Please, let me know what I can do to be helpful.

The M&M Project

 

 

So, here's my next project...

So, here’s my next project…

 

So, I’m standing in the checkout line at Meijer looking around at the various distractions. And there, hidden among the Kardashian magazine covers and “Buy One, Get One” packs of gummy worms, I see candy… and math.

Apparently M&M’s have two sizes the “milk chocolate” ones (known ’round these parts as “regular” M&M’s) but also the “MEGA” sized ones that, according to the package are “3x the chocolate per piece” as the regular M&M’s.

Oh yeah. This is just ASKING for a classroom full of students to test this claim.

But, it’s one thing to have an idea. It’s another thing entirely to design the teacher and students moves that will do what we need to do.

I unleashed this conversation on my Facebook page and here’s what happened:

MMChat MMChat2

 

 

So, we couldn’t decide on a couple of issues: A. mass vs. volume, B. What to do with those colorful candy shells? (3x the chocolate was the claim, after all…)

So, now I ask you: Help me design a lab to test this claim with a classroom of high school students. The school year is coming up soon and activities like these help to not only help students apply their problem-solving procedures to something a bit more tangible, but also, it is activities like these that make the math class something students can look forward to.

I look forward to your input.

Why I’m not THAT worried about the future of math education…

A New York Times article by Elizabeth Green has made its social media rounds lately. “Why Do Americans Stink At Math?” has been tweeted/shared a couple million times by now, with good reason.

It’s actually a really good article with some good story-telling and relevant history, and all the data and examples to back up the title. It’s worth a read. (It isn’t a quick read, mind you, but a good read.)

As far as I can tell, the thesis of the article is in the middle of the piece:

The new math of the ‘60s, the new new math of the ‘80s and today’s Common Core math all stem from the idea that the traditional way of teaching math simply does not work.”

The “traditional way” that Ms. Green speaks of is summed up a bit later in the piece.

Most American math classes follow the same pattern, a ritualistic series of steps so ingrained that one researcher termed it a cultural script. Some teachers call the pattern “I, We, You.” After checking homework, teachers announce the day’s topic, demonstrating a new procedure: “Today, I’m going to show you how to divide a three-digit number by a two-digit number” (I). Then they lead the class in trying out a sample problem: “Let’s try out the steps for 242 ÷ 16” (We). Finally they let students work through similar problems on their own, usually by silently making their way through a work sheet: “Keep your eyes on your own paper!” (You).

Green goes on to say that quite often teachers recognize the limitations of the traditional model, but have a hard time reforming it largely because of poor resources and ineffective training. From later in the piece:

Sometimes trainers offered patently bad information — failing to clarify, for example, that even though teachers were to elicit wrong answers from students, they still needed, eventually, to get to correct ones. Textbooks, too, barely changed, despite publishers’ claims to the contrary.

So, here we go. Sounds like a big problem, right?

Well…

I’m not that concerned. Ya know why?

First off, I don’t want to give the impression that I think that Green is writing untruths or is exaggerating. That isn’t where I’m taking this. American math education needs some serious work. But see, that’s where I get encouraged.

Let’s look at a specific bit of content. How about volume and surface area of prisms?

So, my textbook provides this:

Prism Clip

taken from Holt’s Geometry, 2009 Edition, Pg 684

 

These practice problems fit in with the “I, We, You” model that Ms. Green described in her article. Right on cue, the textbook appears to be pitching to our education system’s weaknesses.

But those weaknesses have entered a brave new world where teachers who have found models that work are not only willing, but also able to share them freely for anyone and everyone who might be looking.

For example:

Andrew Stadel’s “Filing Cabinent” is, by content standards, just another prism surface area problem. But, the situation he sets up is anything but ordinary.

Timon Piccini’s “Pop Box Design” asks a relatively simple question in a context that is approachable by practically everyone.

Dan Meyer’s “Dandy Candies” pushes the envelope on video quality, pushes the same content, and includes it in a blog post that discusses a competitor to “I, We, You.”

All those fantastic resources are available… for free. And the creators can be reached if you have a question about them.

A movement has begun. An (ever-growing) group of math teachers decided that it was one thing to discuss reforming math education and it was quite another to effectively reform math education. The group is getting larger. It’s inclusive. It’s welcoming. It’s free to join. And it doesn’t expect anything from those who join. Everyone does what they are able. Some share lots. Some steal lots. Some do both. The bank of resources is growing.

And this isn’t legislated reform. There is a genuine desire for this. I spoke in Grand Rapids, MI this past spring and was amazed that the crowd that was willing to gather to hear someone talk about reforming math education. Nearly 100 folks crammed into a room to have, what ended up being a rather lively, discussion about how to engage all learners, push all learners, and keep as many learners as possible interested in meaningful mathematical tasks.

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They had to turn people away from a talk on effective math lesson planning.

So, Ms. Green is certainly right. Americans stink at math. But there is a growing group of teachers who are aware of the problem, interested in seeing it solved, and now, more than ever, there are places they can turn to, people they can reach out to (and who are reaching out to them). And it is all available for free on technology that practically everyone already has.

So, forgive me, but I am quite optimistic about where this might take us.