Advice for the MEA, Part 2

This is part two of a two-part series. If you find yourself getting lost and need some background, then please go back one post and pick the story up from the beginning. And on we go…

So, in my last post, we established that the public face of the MEA is one that is dedicated to lobbying, healthcare, benefits, and otherwise interacting in the political and legislative process.

But, the new MEA, the right-to-work MEA, the MEA that has to sell its services to attract members should consider being able to answer one very important question:

What is the MEA going to do to help me become a better educator?

Education is what my job is all about and it is the “E” in the MEA. The MEA is fighting to help me become a better paid educator. The MEA is fighting to help me become an educator with a good healthcare plan.

But what if my main objective is to become a better educator? Can the MEA help me there?

I believe they can. If I were in charge of the MEA, here’s what I’d do. I would begin a major change. The MEA is dedicated to providing Michigan students with the very best educators in the world. So, we are going to cut our lobbying budget in half and instead, the dues that you pay us will be redirected to providing monthly professional development conferences. We will bring in the foremost educational reformers who will provide expert analysis and research-based techniques for improving instruction, assessment, scheduling, sequencing, community relations and instructional leadership.

Also, we will be altering the job descriptions of our building representatives. From now on, local EAs building representatives will be co-observers who will assist the administrators see to it that each member gets observed and evaluated by multiple sets of eyes. The building representatives will be thoroughly and continuously trained to ensure that they are of the highest quality.

Also, the MEA will continue to produce the legislative critique journal, the MEA Voice, but it will also be providing two top-notch professional educational journal for a modest $3 per month cost each. In either the elementary or the secondary version, this monthly journal will include an article from each of the 6 main core areas (math, science, ELA, social studies, fine arts, and foreign language) written by MEA members, approved by a board of 15- to 25-year veteran teachers.

Also, for far too long, the plight of the first-year teacher has been ignored, so in the new MEA, local officers will be personally responsible for the mentorship of the first-year teachers. They will meet weekly with the first-year teachers. The MEA will make sure that Uniserv directors’ offices have a room dedicated to creating a library of effective resources for consumption by first- and second- year teachers. Under the guidance of the local president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer, the first- and second- year teachers will be expected to read books quarterly and be observed by local union members who the staff elects as exemplary teachers to offer support and feedback to the young teachers. The MEA will sponsor a weekend conference that all first- and second- year teachers MUST attend in order to remain in good standing. The conference will be free to all first- and second- year teachers. It will include rap sessions with exemplary teachers, opportunities to observe master teachers, group sessions evaluating student work, and a keystone address by a cutting-edge expert in the field of education.

So, why should you join the MEA? Because, we are going to provide you the resources, the support, and the community to help you become the very best educator you could possibly be. Without us, you might be great, but you are doing it on your own. With us, you will become the very, very best.

How different a message would that be?

MEA, I know you didn’t ask for my advice, but there it is.

Now, let’s go have a great 2013.

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