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Reflecting on the Common Core, Part II

June 9, 2013
Creativity, flexibility, are were on the rise this year.

Creativity, flexibility, are were on the rise this year.

Around Halloween of 2011, we began to prepare to rewrite our geometry class to align with the Common Core. This enabled us to do a couple of things that I had been wanting to do for a while. First, we ditched the textbook. Then we began to move toward Standards-Based Grading (Shawn Cornally (@thinkthankthunk) has some great stuff on this). We also decided to reconsider Algebra as the backbone as had been the previous practice in favor of a more visual, experiential approach.

We made the decision to embrace the CCSS’s Standards of Mathematical Practice because they made so much sense. We imagined building a class around patient problem-solving with strategic use of a variety of materials, student-to-student geometric arguments making use of geometric modeling and repeated reasoning. We imagined a course that drew the student into an experience. We didn’t want to see student memorize facts. We wanted them to experience the relationships, explore the different figures and circumstances, and draw conclusions about the significance of their observations. The Common Core enabled us to do that.

It was a lofty goal. I thought we tried our best this year. We didn’t do all that we were hoping. Our course didn’t live up to my standards. The students still memorized. The students didn’t explore enough. I told my students too many things. They told me too few. (Dan Meyer (@ddmeyer) would say that I was “too helpful.”) Needless to say, we have some work to do and I look forward to all of you coming along side of me for year two. Your support has been unbelievable so far.

Common Core puts a premium on student-to-student discussion

Common Core puts a premium on student-to-student discussion

So that’s that. The 2012-2013 school year is over and with it, the first try at creating a geometry class filled with patient problem-solving with strategic use of a variety of materials, student-to-student geometric arguments making use of geometric modeling and repeated reasoning. Those are our targets. I get 12 weeks to catch my breath and version 2.0 gets released to another collection of eager young minds.

And to me, that’s the essence of Common Core.

I understand the political conflict that exists when a single set of educational expectations are being enforced coast-to-coast. There are a lot of different ideologies, a lot of different beliefs, a lot of different communities. There isn’t much hope of finding something that everyone is excited about.

But, Common Core or not, a class depending heavily on patient problem-solving with strategic use of a variety of materials, student-to-student geometric arguments making use of geometric modeling and repeated reasoning, is something that I suspect most people can get excited about.

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